802.11n

It is a newer standard of WiFi LAN, or wireless local area network technology, subsequent to standards 802.11a, 802.11b and 802.11g. Its proper name is IEEE 802.11n, as it is a protocol developed by the international non-profit Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. The number “11” indicates the IEEE working group assigned to 802 standards, and the “n” refers to a special task group within this body, known as TGn.

To get an actual idea of the speeds expected in megabits per second (mbps), see the table below which compares the different 802.11 standards:

802.11b 2.4 GHz 5-11 mbps
802.11g 2.4 GHz 25-54 mbps
802.11a 5.0 GHz 25-54 mbps
802.11n 2.4 GHz 100-200+ mbps

 

802.11n is a newer standard of WiFi LAN, or wireless local area network technology, subsequent to standards 802.11a, 802.11b and 802.11g. Its proper name is IEEE 802.11n, as it is a protocol developed by the international non-profit Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. The number “11” indicates the IEEE working group assigned to 802 standards, and the “n” refers to a special task group within this body, known as TGn.

The IEEE 802.11n standard is scheduled to be reviewed by TGn in November 2005 and should debut in the marketplace sometime in mid-2006. It will reportedly offer quadruple the data transfer rates of the current fastest WiFi technology. It will also operate on the 2.4 gigahertz (GHz) band, like 802.11b and 802.11g. This frequency does not require line-of-sight availability like 802.11a, which works in the regulated 5 GHz band.

802.11n

802.11n

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